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With the recent warm weather, I decided to head up to Lakes Basin this morning to see what’s hikeable. I’ve been out of town for a week and before I left, we were cross-country skiing in Lakes Basin, so I wasn’t sure what to expect.

I was happy to discover the road in to the Lakes Basin trailhead is in great shape with just a small amount of easily passable snow on the road. I decided to do what I call the “Bear Lakes Loop” and chose to do it counter-clockwise, heading up to Long Lake first, then around to the Bears.

The first third up to Long Lake was wet, but I encountered no snow. As I ascended though, I ran into a pretty solid snow pack. I had enough traction with my heavy-weight hiking boots (they have very good soles) to make traversing the snow pretty easy. I didn’t sink in more than six inches or so as long as I stayed away from any exposed rocks and Manzanita where unexpected air pockets can twist an ankle in a heartbeat.

And what a beautiful panorama greeted me when I reached the lake. Half the lake was still covered in snow and the surrounding walls of granite are dappled with white. There is something about those granite walls at Long Lake that always takes my breath away. This morning was no exception.

Heading up past Long Lake I ran into more snow which continued until I got down to Cub Lake. From there to about Big Bear, there was little snow on the ground. Heading back down toward the trailhead from Big Bear, however, there were large patches of deep snow, but again, I found the footing quite doable in just hiking boots.

I suspect the snow will disappear pretty quickly with the warm weather predicted for this week. If you get a chance to do some hiking this week, you’ll be in for a visual treat.

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Approximately 2 miles round trip, gentle incline, snow on the trail.

One of the first trails to be accessible in the spring is the Smith Lake trail. That would be reason enough to hike it, but it also offers a gorgeous lake set in a volcanic bowl with a rim trail above from which one can see for miles to the north and east. There is also a lovely area for camping or picnicking on the south side of the lake, shaded by massive, moss-covered firs and pines. And the final bonus is that a short, fairly gentle hike provides access to all this beauty.

The trailhead is accessed from the Gray Eagle Lodge road, which is off Gold Lake highway. There is ample parking and a bathroom at the trailhead. The first part of the hike has southeast exposure, which is why the snow melts so quickly there. It’s a steady incline on the side of the mountain offering wonderful views and a nice warm start to the hike.

About half way to the lake, you’ll enter trees and shade, which is where I encountered snow this morning. It was passable, but a hiking pole or a sturdy stick would have been nice to have.

The trail winds around behind the mountain so there was snow for a few hundred yards until the bridge over Smith Creek, which was running with wild abandon as you would imagine in the spring

Just another short quarter mile or so and you’re at the lake, shimmering in all it’s blue-green beauty. I love swimming in the lake in the summer, but today, only my trusty 4-legged companion found the water enjoyable.

If you want more of a hike with spectacular views, backtrack an eighth of a mile or so and you’ll see a turn-off to the north. A few switchbacks will take you gently to the rim of the bowl where you’ll be greeted with expansive views. This time of year the ridge trail is an out-and-back hike because the south side of the lake, which is in shade all year, is still covered in snow and fast-moving creeks cross the trail.
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The late arrival of snow this year has brought many blessings to the Lost Sierra. An added bonus is warm weather cross-country skiing. There’s nothing like experiencing the beauty of winter white in a short sleeved T-shirt.

I was able to sneak up to Lake Davis for a short ski this morning. I chose to ski on the snow packed by snowmobilers rather than mess with the inconsistent conditions that I found in the untrammeled snow. A couple silly spills made that decision easy. I headed up the road on the west side of the lake and then took a right and skied out to the end of the Old Camp Five peninsula. There was plenty of snow on the road where the snowmobilers had packed it, but the edges of the lake were exposed beach. Despite the cold water, my trusty canine companion just had to take a dip. I was not tempted.

As I passed the old snag on the way back, I was wishing I could hear the stories it could tell. It looks like it has seen some pretty severe weather over the decades.

With Smith Peak guiding the way, I headed back to the car with a sense of complete well-being and satisfaction. These springtime cross-country ski days always feel like a bonus to me. I love winter and enjoy all the outdoor activities associated with it despite the cold. But skiing in warm weather just feels decadent — like the whipped cream on top of the chocolate sundae!

I suspect the snow will last another couple weeks, so grab your skis and enjoy a little summer skiing.

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After disappointingly dry weather in January and February prevented the races from being held, the enthusiasm was sky high yesterday at the World Championship Longboard Races held at the historic Johnsville Ski Bowl.

For those of you who have never attended a race, I hope I can convince you to put it on your calendar for next winter. It’s such a fun day for the whole family with sledding and snowshoeing, great old-timey music, food, and of course, Brewing Lair beer.

The races are competitive, but the atmosphere is one of camaraderie and good cheer among competitors. There are always some exciting close races and some hilarious “Keystone Cop” type comedies with fallen racers doing everything in their power to get across the finish line.

Here’s how it works. Anyone who wants to can race. Plumas Ski Club has extra skis, so you will be able to rent skis for the race, until they are all claimed. Period clothing is requested for all competitors and footwear must be leather. No modern ski boots are allowed. Around 11:30, each competitor is assigned a start number by random drawing. The competitors then race in twos, with the winner moving onto the next round. Men and women race separately. It then comes down to the last race of 3 to determine 1st, 2nd and 3rd places.

There is a groomed sledding hill for kids of all ages to enjoy. A simple fare of grilled burgers and dogs is available for purchase along with an endless flow of Brewing Lair Beer. Spectators can set up anywhere they’d like and many folks bring outdoor chairs and a picnic lunch to make a day of it. Bring your snowshoes or backcountry skis and head up to Eureka Lake or Eureka Peak for added adventure.

For more information and the history of the ski bowl and the Longboard Races, visit the Plumas Ski Club website. The races are held the third Sunday in January, February and March each year.




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Winter has hit the Lost Sierra at last. It’s been snowing off and on for the last couple weeks. We’re not talking a dusting or few paltry inches here and there, this is the real deal – FEET of snow throughout the area.

Get your cross-country skis or snowshoes out or fire up your snowmobile and come explore Lakes Basin in all its winter wondrousness.

I only had a short timeframe available today so I took my cross-country skis to a private road I have access to near my house. As you can see from the photos, it was just gorgeous, making for a happy human and an even happier pup.

When I have more time, some of my favorite places for cross-country skiing are:

Mohawk-Chapman road off Gold Lake Highway – This is a gently inclining road that offers fabulous views just a couple miles in.

Lake Davis – Lake Davis is north of Portola off Highway 70. I usually ski from the unplowed dirt road on the west shore.  You can park where Lake Davis Road turns east at the south end of the lake, head north on the road, then ski the wide open terrain that lies between the road and the lake itself. There’s miles and miles of open skiing to enjoy.

Plumas-Eureka State Park – A group of dedicated volunteers groom a set of trails in and around the campground at the State Park. You can access these trails from the Mohawk-Johnsville Rd. and the Campground Rd. behind the Museum. The volunteers produce a grooming report that you can find on the volunteer website. If you use the trails please consider making a donation. No park funds are available to keep the groomers in fuel.

 

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I’ve certainly enjoyed the late season hiking in Lakes Basin this winter due to the lack of snow, but I was overjoyed to awaken yesterday to a few inches of snow on the ground in the valley and a heavy white layer on Mills Peak and the trees leading up to it.

This morning I decided to go exploring to see what’s still accessible. Gold Lake Highway is now closed so we parked in the staging area parking lot conveniently located at the road closure point. There’s a pretty little trail that runs about a mile from the parking lot through the forest and comes out on the Gray Eagle Lodge road.

It’s a fun trail on skis when there’s more snow, but today it was totally enjoyable in hiking boots. There’s a slight elevation gain, which is much more noticeable on skis or snowshoes. On foot, it’s a gentle climb, suitable for any level hiker. This is also a great summer trail because it’s short with lots of shade – perfect for families with young kids or people who lack the stamina for longer hikes. Come on out and get your winter wonderland fix and check out this little slice of nature’s beauty.

Update: 1/21/18 This trail was one of the last ones built by the Forest Service about a decade ago before budget cuts took the USFS out of the trail creation and maintenance business. We’re fortunate to have the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship in our backyard to maintain the myriad trails that wind through Plumas and Sierra counties and build new ones for us to enjoy.

On yesterday’s hike we found a fairly large downed tree that was easy to climb over in boots, but would be very challenging in snowshoes and impossible on skis. I happened to run into Greg Williams, the brain and heart behind SBTS, last night and asked him if he could take care of the downed tree sometime. I received these pictures from him today after he and his son had taken care of the tree. Now that’s some amazing trail maintenance response time! If you enjoy hiking or mountain biking in this area, please check out the work of Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship and consider supporting their efforts.

 

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One positive aspect of this strangely dry winter is the fact that Gold Lake Highway is still open and hiking is still abundant. With a couple hours available before a late afternoon shift at work I was feeling the urge to get out and explore before forecasted rains start up again tomorrow. With recent rain and very cold overnight temperatures I was concerned about encountering icy trails at high elevations. I hadn’t been on the Graeagle Creek trail for awhile so I thought I’d take that route to the Smith Lake trailhead. It would all be fairly low elevation so shouldn’t be icy.

Entering the woods from the parking area just off Gold Lake Highway is like entering a totally new world. The ground is softly carpeted with beautiful red pine needles, florescent green moss adorns the north facing side of the trees and the rush of Graeagle Creek is an alluring siren.


Just a quarter mile from the road lies the beautiful Graeagle Creek crossing. I was struck by the beauty of the frost-encased exposed tree roots that looked like multi-media pieces of art. The rails of the bridge were still frosty yet I lingered to take in the dynamic energy of the coursing creek. The colors of the rocks seemed so vibrant with the overcast sky and clear, clear water. It’s really a glorious spot.

After crossing the creek I stayed on the path to the Smith Lake trailhead, but a short distance up the trail I encountered a new option. The very new sign indicated the Smith Creek Trail was a mile away off to the right. I’d never been on this stretch of trail before, so off I went to explore.

The trail is beautiful, opening onto land I’d never experienced. Initially the trail heads north and slightly west with views to the east of endless pines and towering Beckwourth Peak in the distance. Continuing on, the trail crests the ridgeline and crosses it to head more westward and slightly south offering breathtaking views of Eureka Peak in the foreground and the towering white boulder that is Mt. Lassen in the distance.

After crossing the ridgeline, the trail begins to descend and the wide open expanse gives way to the forest. Initially, the forest feels spacious but as the trail continues to descend, the density of the trees made it increasingly dark and a bit foreboding. It will be a great, cool hike in the heat of the summer. Since I wasn’t sure exactly where it was going to let out and a looming deadline to make it to work, I decided to head back to civilization without reaching the end of the trail. I suspect it ends in the Smith Creek subdivision somewhere. I didn’t track time or distance, but my guess is that the turn onto this trail is about a half mile from the Graeagle Creek Trailhead, and walked about a mile or a little more before turning back.

I’ll definitely explore this surprising new trail when I have more time. It’s a great elevation for early and late season hiking.

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Holiday Greetings to all from the Lost Sierra. It’s a gorgeous Christmas day, made that much better by a walk in the snow by a lake. There is just something about large bodies of water that draw me like a gravitational pull, and today Gold Lake did the pulling.

After being under the weather I was desperate for some fresh air and my dog needed a good romp so off we went with another friend and her dog. It’s unusual for Gold Lake Highway to be open and dry this time of year, but it makes easy access to the high country. We drove to the Gold Lake Campground road once again for a lovely walk. The snow is about 5 inches deep with a light, crunchy layer on top. Someone had driven down the campground road making the walking very easy going.

We wandered down the road and back through the campground to the dam where my friend’s Golden decided that no water is too cold for her. My dog, after barely tolerating the Santa hat, was having no part of that cold water.

The patterns of snow and ice on the lake were fascinating, and with the light haze of cloud cover, the lake had a silvery reflective glow that was stunning. It was as if the lake had been covered with frosting that had been whipped up and then partially melted. Every angle offered a unique perspective.

While it had been cool at the start of the hike, the temperature climbed into the forties and the clouds steadily cleared leaving us plenty warm and sun-drenched by the time we wandered back up the road to the car. What a spectacular way to spend Christmas day.

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The snow has been falling in the Lost Sierra in fits and starts. Way back in September Lakes Basin got 4-5 inches, which was not necessarily a welcome weather change for my friends who were camping at Gold Lake. October also delivered a couple small, early-season snow drops, but the weather warmed up between them so there has been little accumulation and Gold Lake Highway has remained open. However, last week’s snowfall and this week’s cold temps may change that trend.

It’s lovely to be able to get up to Lakes Basin this late in the season. There’s still great hiking to be had and the beauty factor is off the charts! The light covering of snow completely transforms the area and makes it feel like you’re discovering familiar terrain for the very first time. Even roads that you typically drive on become beautiful forest walks, like today’s walk on the Gold Lake campground road. Some of the lower elevation hikes are still hikable such as the Graeagle Creek and Smith Lake trails. The few inches of snow create a bit more of a workout, but hey, that’s one of the reasons we all go hiking, right?

Take advantage of the mild late season and get some wintertime hiking in. You’ll be happy you did.

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The holiday season officially starts in our little corner of the Lost Sierra on the first weekend in December. There is nothing sweeter than the community spirit evident at the two holiday celebrations; one in Portola, the other in Graeagle.

Festivities kick off Friday night with Portola’s Light Parade and Christmas Fair. Despite the chilly evening, Commercial Street was lined with families eager to see this year’s line-up of illuminated parade entrants. They weren’t disappointed as once again the local businesses and organizations created a festive atmosphere with their brightly lit vehicles and holiday-themed floats.

The central bonfire was a popular spot to warm up between shopping at the old-fashioned Christmas fair booths, watching the parade, checking raffle tickets to see if you’d won one of the dozens of donated gift baskets and waiting for the tree to be lit. Christmas music flowed throughout the evening and a warm, neighborly time was had by all.

On Saturday the festivities move to Graeagle. The businesses in the little red shops that line highway 89 are open for early Christmas shopping, each one offering some type of treat for shoppers, either a signature beverage or snack. It’s a very festive shopping experience with a couple hundred of your closest friends!

Santa always makes a visit and the horse-drawn sleigh delights kids of all ages as it makes its way through town. Due to the loss of half of the team of horses that have drawn the sleigh for many years, this year’s sleigh was pulled by a tractor decorated for the holiday. Adults like me seemed to be much more disappointed than the kids who didn’t seem to mind at all.

The bonfire was again a big draw as everyone gathered on the lawn to listen to music by Danny Horton and cross their fingers in hopes they’d win the gift basket full of Graeagle Bucks and treats as they awaited the tree lighting. Nature provided an amazing complement to the man-made visuals with a nearly full moon rising through the trees as the huge pine tree came alive with colored lights.

If you’re looking for festivities that bring out the true spirit of the holidays, make a note to be in the Lost Sierra the first weekend of December next year.

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It was one of those Graeagle afternoons where everywhere I looked, I thought I was in a theater set. The sunlight against the dark, foreboding skies set off the trees and mountainside like a purposefully lit scene. There was a quality to the light that caught my breath each time the clouds opened to let out a new slice of brilliance.

It is the enduring surprise of the Lost Sierra that every season, every day really, offers an opportunity and invitation to shift one’s perspective from the routine of daily life to the limitless possibility the natural world evokes. It’s like living with one foot firmly on the ground and the other in the air, always ready to step into the unknown.

People from outside the area often ask, what on earth do you DO up there in the mountains? I used to actually try to answer the question, but now I see it as similar to the axiom, “If you have to ask the price, you can’t afford it.” If you have to ask, What do you do? you probably won’t understand the answer. Perhaps this blog is my ongoing attempt to answer that question.

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Some days, I just don’t feel up to taking on the elements. My sister was in town visiting and the wind was howling and the cloud cover was making a hike seem more like effort and less like joy so we decided to see nature through a completely different lens—through art.

We’re fortunate to have in Graeagle a truly inspiring art gallery aptly named, Red House Art Gallery. It’s housed in a little red house on the green in “downtown” Graeagle and is open year-round. The owners, Toni and Brian Carl, bring in many local artists’ work as well as art they discover on their travels. They have a keen eye for finding engaging art of the natural world, whether paintings, photography, jewelry, glass or ceramics.

On this particular day the sun periodically broke through the clouds adding spotlights of illumination to an already perfectly lighted gallery. What a rich and luscious visual experience it was! Every time I go into the gallery I am reminded how much I love experiencing the world through others’ perspective.

As winter approaches and the weather turns colder, don’t forget that you can have a wonderful experience of the great outdoors by visiting the Red House Art Gallery.  www.RedHouseArt.net

 

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It’s that gorgeous time of year in the Lost Sierra… crisp nights, warm days and foliage making its magical transformation from green to all shades of yellow, orange and red.

There’s a leisurely pace to the color changes this year. During the drought years the color changes were unspectacular and lasted a short time. But this year nature is putting on quite a show.

You don’t have to go off the beaten path to find bright colors. Downtown Quincy is full of deep reds and oranges on the main drag and on the streets surrounding the courthouse. Graeagle has some bright spots of red in the Graeagle Meadows complex and the aspens all over town are shimmering in bright yellow. Along the Feather River you’ll find more aspens in all shades of yellow, cottonwoods in deep gold and willow bushes glimmering burnt orange in the setting sun.


Further into the mountains and in the forest, the colors are often more subtle, but no less beautiful. Wind through your favorite parts of Lakes Basin and take in the oranges, yellows and reds you’ll find from large aspen trees to smaller gooseberry bushes and a host of varieties in between.

For those of you who, like me, have wondered why leaves change color, this article provides a succinct explanation. There are additional article suggestions following the article.

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Having a mid-week day off is always lovely, but having one in the fall in the Lost Sierra is an extra special occurrence. It’s so gorgeous out that I decided to visit my favorite aspen grove which is just off the Frazier Falls road near the parking lot for Frazier Falls.

The trees circle a beautiful little meadow standing like sentinels until the wind blows, then they dance like they’ve just discovered bebop. Today the bright yellow leaves are all a-jiggle as I lie in the soft dry grass listening to the chatter of birds and chipmunks and the soft rustle of the dancing aspens. There’s only enough moisture in the upper air to form the slightest wisp of clouds in the otherwise bluebird sky. It’s a very fine fall day.

The Lost Sierra is known for its rugged beauty and outdoor recreation, but it’s also a haven for stillness and silence, a place to move at a different pace. I suspect that’s why so many who come to visit end up finding a way to stay. The quiet simply becomes addictive.


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I love volunteering. I get to use my skills in different settings and feel good about supporting groups I believe in. Sometimes volunteering is about the mission of the organization and sometimes it’s simply about having some fun with people I know. And sometimes, like last night, the two come together.

Last night was the opening of the Grinduro festival, the newest of the Triple Crown biking events that raise money for Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship, a mighty local organization that builds and maintains outdoor hiking/biking trails in Plumas, Lassen and Tahoe national forests. This organization is worthy of its own post, but suffice it to say that these folks accomplish a LOT and have a darn good time doing it.

Grinduro is a cycling event and festival that combines the best elements of a mountain bike enduro with a gravel grinder-style road race. Festivities include two days of excellent food, a handmade bike show, an art exhibit, live music and camping.
My “job” was to sell all kinds of Grinduro-branded merchandise from T-shirts to socks, gloves, hats and jerseys. Not a difficult task at all since the merchandise was all great looking and participants seemed eager to support SBTS and memorialize the event with cool gear.

I met some really interesting folks from all over the western United States and even a couple from Europe! Some were hard core cyclists eager for the competition and some were casual cyclists who wanted to try something new. All were intrigued by the event and happy to be spending the weekend in Quincy riding the trails and supporting the hard work of SBTS.

There were food trucks with a great variety of culinary delights to try and fire pits to warm us while we dined. The entertainment started after dark with an inspiring movie about the vision and work of SBTS, then live music under the stars. It was a fabulous way to spend a Friday night, and for festival participants, it was just the warm-up for a weekend-long fun-fest.

If you’re looking for a fun way to become part of the community, consider attending a local fund-raising event or even volunteering. Your contribution will certainly be appreciated. Learn more about Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship Here.

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3.75 miles for the full loop, beginner to moderate
Approximately 2.5 miles to the lake and back, which is a great beginner hike 

There are so many good reasons to hike Smith Lake! The photos below are from today’s hike, but it’s equally beautiful in the spring and full summer. Here are my top five reasons for loving this hike.
  1. Because of its full sun exposure at the start of the hike and its relatively low elevation (lake elevation is 6100’) this hike is one of the first to be accessible in the spring and one of the last to remain accessible once the snow starts to fall. The trailhead is also one of the lowest, making it a shorter drive to start the hike.
  2. The exposed rocky ridge on the northern rim (accessed via what was called the Jamison Connector trail, which is supposed to be renamed by the Forest Service to Smith Lake trail) offer views for miles and makes you feel like you’re on top of the world without a strenuous hike (highest elevation is 6300’).
  3. It’s a great loop hike, which is my favorite kind, enjoyable in either direction. Counter-clockwise, you get your climb in at the beginning and finish in the cool shade of the south side. Clockwise, you get the magic of the forest, crossing the creek on a log and the cool shade at the beginning and then end with the fabulous vistas from the northern rim followed by a long downhill.
  4. I’m not sure why the color of Smith Lake is so unusual, but it has a blue-green color that is different from all the other lakes in the area. Some days (or some times of day, I can’t figure out which) the color is nearly emerald from the ridge overlooking the lake. I just love the color of this lake!
  5. You can get a good workout if you go at the uphills with gusto but it can also be a leisurely hike when you’re in the mood to simply commune with nature. When time is short and I want to bust out some quick exercise, I blast up the face, then take the switchbacks to the rim full steam. But sometimes I just want to drink in all the views and the hike is more of a meander. I love the flexibility of the hike!
Note: The trail on the back (west) end of the lake is not maintained. A few of us locals go out periodically with clippers to keep the Manzanita back, but the trail itself is fairly steep with loose rock and not in the same good shape as other trails in Lakes Basin. Also, despite our efforts this year, the south side is massively overgrown due to the plentiful water and warm summer. Hopefully we’ll get back up there before the snow falls to clear some of the brush back.

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I worked late today and didn’t have time for a proper hike, so I took my dog to the Mill Pond in Graeagle for a few laps.

It was one of those simply stunning mountain evenings with the setting sun casting its soft yellow glow and the clouds playing their dramatic role with flourish. Even the berries seemed brighter and more photogenic than usual.

After 11 years I still feel awe and gratitude that I get to live in such a mountain paradise. Tonight’s peaceful walk was yet one more reminder of how special a place this is.

 

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We in the Lost Sierra know that the Historic Longboard Revival Race Series provides some of the greatest family-friendly winter entertainment available. But as of today the event is no longer our little secret.

The cover of the September 21st issue of Powder Magazine features a photo of the women winners of the World Championship Longboard Revival Series Race held in March, 2017 at the Johnsville Ski Bowl and the issue contains a great article about the event.

Written by David Page with photography from David Reddick, the 8-page article covers last March’s World Championship race and much of the history and lore behind the races. It’s a great read with terrific photography including some historic photos you may not have seen before. Grab a copy from the newsstands or subscribe HERE.

The 2018 Historic Longboard Revival Race Series will be held the third Sunday in January, February and March of 2018. Learn more about this crazy backwoods fun at Plumas Ski Club’s website.



Left: 2nd place Sarah Johnstone
Middle: 1st place Jessica Nelson
Right: 3rd place Austyn Harrington

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One of the great end of summer treats in the Lost Sierra is Thimbleberries. They are delicious! Sweet with just the right amount of tart, almost imperceptible  seeds, and they grow in patches all over Lakes Basin in the cool, shady, forest understory.

Last week’s electrical storms in the Basin delayed my annual berry-picking, but today I thought I’d check a couple of patches that lie just off the trail from the Lakes Basin campground toward Long Lake. Typically, the ripening season is just after Labor Day so I knew I was a little late, but I had my fingers crossed that I might get lucky since everything bloomed late this year.

Thimbleberries are a member of the Rubus family (think blackberries, raspberries, etc.) and like raspberries they have no thorns so they’re fun to pick and eat. They grow low to the ground and are easily identified by their large, palm-shaped leaves.

The lower elevation patches had passed their prime and I found very few berries, but I headed to higher elevation to test my luck. Fortunately, I found a big patch with many berries still left on the vine. Some of the bright red berries were dried out, but I managed to find enough juicy berries to sate my seasonal appetite.

An added bonus was the discovery of late season wildflowers!

Be sure to add the search for Thimbleberries to next summer’s list of Lost Sierra adventures. It’s a great outing for the whole family.

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It started off benignly enough. I was running some errands in Portola and saw the first fluffballs over Beckworth Peak. Hmmm, I thought to myself. Best to get the swim in early today because it looks like thunderclouds are forming.

It’s what I call “Thunder Bumper” season in the Lost Sierra. After a very hot, dry summer we’re lucky to be having late afternoon thunder showers roll through, drenching the area in much needed rain. The lightening that accompanies it can be dangerous, but so far the lightning-induced fires have been minimal and have been extinguished right away.


I rallied my die-hard swimming friends and we headed to Gold Lake to sneak a swim in before the storm clouds built up too much intensity. Definitely not one of the smarter decisions… “die-hard” was close to being an apt descriptor!

We headed up to the southern shore of the lake past the campground to a little cove we like. I had seen the thunderheads building to the southeast, but prevailing winds tend to be southwesterly so I thought we’d be okay.

The water temperature is still very pleasant so we decided to swim out to one of the small islands. As we neared the island a few hundred yards from shore, I felt something cold pelting my back. I thought one of my friends must be playing a trick, but when I looked up, I saw a huge dark cloud overhead and hail pounding the water around me. We quickly swam back to shore and hunkered in the trees as we toweled off. The air temperature had dropped significantly and we heard the low rumble of thunder as we clamored through the hail storm back to our cars. The hail pelted us all the way down Gold Lake highway, and the storm ultimately produced quite a bit of lightening and rain. Looking back at it from the Mohawk Valley, I knew we were lucky to have dodged a bullet!



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